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WW1 BRITISH ARMY 1915 TRIO MEDAL GROUP GALLIPOLI & POSSIBLE WOUNDED DAY 1 SOMME

SOLD Swing mounted WW1 British medal trio to Andrew Botten, who served with the 2nd London Regiment in Egypt, Gallipoli & France, with a very good chance of being wounded on the 1st Day of the Battle of the Somme, 1st July 1916. *1915 Star named in impressed capitals: 2571 PTE. A. BOTTEN. 2-LOND. R. *British War Medal and Victory Medal named in impressed capitals:2571 PTE. A. BOTTEN. 2-LOND. R.2571 Private Andrew Melhuish Nash Botten was born in Bristol, Gloucestershire in 1884. He served with the 2nd Battalion throughout the war, Egypt 30th August 1915 to 5th October 1915, deploying...

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Swing mounted WW1 British medal trio to Andrew Botten, who served with the 2nd London Regiment in Egypt, Gallipoli & France, with a very good chance of being wounded on the 1st Day of the Battle of the Somme, 1st July 1916.
*1915 Star named in impressed capitals: 2571 PTE. A. BOTTEN. 2-LOND. R.
*British War Medal and Victory Medal named in impressed capitals:2571 PTE. A. BOTTEN. 2-LOND. R.2571 Private Andrew
Melhuish Nash Botten was born in Bristol, Gloucestershire in 1884. He served with the 2nd Battalion throughout the war, Egypt 30th August 1915 to 5th October 1915, deploying with the 2nd Battalion at Suvla Bay (Gallipoli) joining the 88th Brigade, of the 29th Division. He was withdrawn back to Egypt on the 22nd January 1916, when the Battalion, along with the remaining British troops at Gallipoli upon evacuation. Along with the Battalion, he was deployed to France 24th April 1916 and is shown to have been withdrawn on the 4th July 1916. This key date was 3 days after the fateful 1st Day of the Battle of Albert, more commonly known as the 1st Day of the battle of the Somme, the bloodiest day of the British Army, in which it suffered 20,000 dead and 40,000 wounded. The 2nd Battalion, The London Regiment suffered 253 casualties on the first day, with more to follow before the Battalion was withdrawn. Botten is more than likely to have been wounded on one of the first, if not days afterwards, as he is shown to have been withdrawn immediately after the commencement of the famous battle. The massive numbers of casualties on the first day overwhelmed the casualty clearing stations and hospitals, resulting in men lying wounded for days, being unaccounted for, hence sketchy records & dates of those wounded/killed. He is not shown to have been engaged again over 4 months, again with the 2nd Battalion, more than likely with his new regimental number 230700. His wounds/departure from the 2nd Battalion from July 1916 would have resulted him being struck off the effective strength/list, hence the new regimental number. He sees out the rest of the war from 19th November 1916 to 13th February 1919 in France. Andrew Botten died in December 1971, in Enfield 1971, aged 87.

Medals come with M.I.C. and Battalion roll.

Weight 0.440925 kg
Dimensions 10 × 5 × 5 cm
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